Marketing and the Potato

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As we’re talking about marketing this month, Rebecca and Heather are going to look at what different mediums have done to successfully gain viral attention. In doing so, we will break down what it was about these marketing ideas that we found so memorable, and look at how they would translate to literary world.

We’ve broken these marketing ploys down into four key areas.

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Curiosity

These were the ideas that piqued the interest of the target audience by withholding information. By only providing part of the picture, the consumers were left searching for more pieces of the puzzle which generated hype and global reach across social media.

Cards Against Humanity’s 30 second Super Bowl ad that was a single shot of a potato with the word ‘Advertisement’ etched into it. It sent Twitter into a frenzy as people tried to decipher what it was about.

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Yes this is the real ad

The Matrix and u: hygiene products used a similar concept. The Matrix advertising posed a single question–‘What is the Matrix?’ and had a site set up devoted to the furthering the riddle.

 

Every question needs an answer.

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The VIP Experience

Making your consumer feel extra special is a great promotional tool and can create lifetime loyal followers. Everyone loves exclusivity, we all want to be a part of that little club. As a whole, people have the ‘keeping up with the Joneses’ mentality, we all want more, and when given the opportunity to get something extra that no one else has, we more often than not jump at that chance. So using this main trait to your marketing advantage would be wise.

For example, Skyrim offered up free games for life, but the catch was you had to name your baby that happened to be born on the games release day the main protagonists name… Dovahkiin. You didn’t need to be one of the two people who actually went ahead and won this prize to be drawn to the weirdness of it.

You don’t have to offer up anything this dramatic, limited editions, and VIP tickets are also great draws, with youtube unboxing a few simple extras thrown in with your advanced copy can be the star of the show.

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Interactive

Get people involved. Get them out looking, talking, generating excitement. Your audience are the ones who can get word of mouth happening in a big way and usually drive awareness the most.

A great example of this was Bioshock 2s launch when they created ten promotional images and hid them in wine bottles. These bottle were placed on ten random beaches worldwide with clues for their fandom on where to find them. Kind of like what Willie Wonka did with his golden tickets.

You could do something as simple as a blog post scavenger hunt with a prize for the winner. Facebook launch parties get the word out there, and Instagram is a good tool to get people taking pictures with your book on launch day.

Resident Evil utilised a gruesome scavenger hunt where the winner would receive a trip to Africa. Which leads us into our next point.

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Shock Value (Trigger Warning for extreme gore)

Resident Evil rules shock value. Shocking your consumer either works for or against you, but either way it generates conversation.

With the scavenger hunt, body parts were scattered around Trafalgar Square in London. This gained media attention, and freaked out the onlookers who weren’t involved in the stunt.

Resident Evil 6 went a step further with a butcher’s shop in London’s famous meat-market Smithfield, selling ‘human meat’. The proceeds of these sales went to the Limbless Associate, a U.K. charity for amputees and other who have lost limbs.

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Now, obviously you don’t need to go to these extremes, but pushing the envelope so your marketing ideas go against the grain of what society deems ‘acceptable’ or ‘expected’ is one way to get people talking.

The most important part of marketing is to be memorable.

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I just want you extra time and your–kiss!

In honour of Valentine’s Day coming up in a little more than a week, I wanted to talk to you guys about kissing in novels, and my opinion on the right and wrong way to do it (NB: this is JUST an opinion, and I totally get that other people like other things … let’s all hold hands and … kiss? No, that’s not right …).
Do:
-Do build up to it. There is nothing I like more than a well built-up kiss, where you’re ready, you’re just so ready for it to happen! Think Colleen Hoover’s Slammed. Or, my lovely friend Stacey Nash’s Forget Me Not/The Collective series.That was a first kiss I loved.
-Make it real. I love kisses in novels that have a little awkward moment, or that aren’t picture perfect, such as at least one I can think of in L. M. Augustine’s Click to Subscribe.

Don’t
-‘Deepen the kiss.’ As a freelance editor of many romantic NA novels, ‘deepening the kiss’ is one of the most common expressions I see. It serves a purpose, and I get it … But it makes me think of a tongue forcing its way down a throat. And really, who wants to choke on that?
-Clash teeth. Okay, this is totally a personal preference here, and I know it can be a sign of an awkward real kiss (something I said I loved) or perhaps a really rushed, passionate one, but clashing teeth gives me THAT feeling, with the shivers, and the nails, and the chalkboard, and makes me feel like popping on a mouth guard before I engage in my next game of tonsil hockey.

But enough about me; what do you think? What do you love and hate about kissing in novels? Would love to hear from you below.

Lauren (3)

Lauren K. McKellar is an author and editor. Her upcoming NA novel, The Problem With Crazy, is released next week. Lauren enjoys margaritas, long walks on the beach, and making out with her fiancé in the moonlight.