Posts by Stacey Nash

Writing for the young and new adult market, Stacey's books are all adventure filled stories with a good dose of danger, a smattering of romance, and plenty of KISSING! Hailing from the Hunter Valley in New South Wales, she loves nothing more than immersing herself in the beauty and culture of the local area. Author of the Collective Series and the Oxley College Saga.

Marketing: How to lose friends and not influence people

Since it’s something we here at AO&R struggle with to varying degrees, the crew decided that this month’s topic should be marketing, so hang on to your seats … we’ll be talking about marketing mayhem all month!

Now, I’m no expert on the topic, but I am a regular Joe on all the regular social media channels. I also have friends who frequent social media, many of which are young adults. I’m a member of a few author groups and a few reader groups both on Facebook and in real life. So although I’m not experienced when it comes to marketing, I do hear a little about what people love and hate. There’s one thing all these groups and people have in common (other than a love of books) and I hear it often.

From the authors:

How can I get people to buy my book?

From the readers / regular Joes:

How can I empty my social media of all the crap people are trying to sell me?

Oh dear.

As authors we want visibility. We want people to know our books exist, to read them, to love them, to gossip about how great they are, but how do we make this happen? I’m going to leave that to someone else to expand on and instead let’s talk about the quickest ways to make that not happen.

“If I’ve never heard of the author or my friends haven’t recommended them I won’t one-click.” (facebook group)

“If an author continually posts ‘buy my book’ I unfollow them. I want to know the real them, not the sales pitch.” – R (facebook readers group)

“If I wanted to buy a book I’d go to the bookstore, not click a link.” – Miss S (14 y.o)

“Authors are all the same on twitter. They just want you to buy their (retracted swear) book. BORING.” (facebook group)

“I hate seeing ads in my facebook feed. They get in the way of my real friends’ posts.” – V (School mum)

“I followed my friend’s page to support her, but…” *shrugs* “she just wanted me to share her posts and all that did was annoy my friends. I eventually stopped reading her posts.” – H (school mum, in reference to a small business, not books)

“I didn’t click to buy it the first time she posted. What makes her think I’d buy it on the tenth post?” – H (school mum)

Righty-o then. :/

 

Given all of those comments, how does one market on social media? Carefully, thoughtfully, and with the right targeting. If you want to stop potential readers from scrolling right on by I suggest avoiding the following things I’ve heard our target audience complain about;

  • Unsolicited ‘crap’ in news feeds
  • Being expected / asked to share promotional material
  • Only seeing promotional posts / photos from a page
  • Continually seeing pitches for the same product
  • Instragam photos full of nothing but the author’s books
  • Tweets full of links (sorry tweeps)
  • Facebook posts flogging products, even if it’s a different product each time
  • Spamming (that’s the same thing posted/shared repeatedly)

So, how can an author effectively sell books? Lauren had some great ideas on Facebook marketing last week. And if you tune into the rest of our posts this month, AO&R’s other bloggers have some more ideas. Plus, we’ve got an interview with an industry professional coming up, so make sure you stay tuned. There is sure to be some great advice!

While we’re waiting though … what’s your biggest pet peeve when it comes to social media advertising?


Stacey Nash hates marketing with a passion, but she’s trying to get better at it. How else will she sell all the great books she’s written? To find out more about Stacey’s books or to connect with her on social media (where she tries to be engaging), check out these places: www.stacey-nash.com, instagram, twitter, facebook.

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Get to know Heather

In celebration of our two new bloggers we’re using March to reintroduce you to the AO&R team. I had the pleasure of chatting with our fabulous reviewer / contributor Heather. Here’s what she had to say.

Thanks for joining us today, Heather. We see your fabulous reviews on the blog, but our readers would like to know a little more about you. Fill us in!

I live in Newcastle, Australia which is such a pretty, underrated city. I’m seriously outnumbered by my three boys, so I make sure to fill our house with Disney movies and musical soundtracks to balance them out. I write ferociously, read addictively, and spend far too much time dancing to the Wiggles. Sarcasm and dry wit are basically what I live for.

Ha! Maybe your boys will grow up loving Disney. How do you balance work, writing, and a young family?

Badly. Haha is that an answer? I’m on maternity leave right now, which means I get two or three hours during nap time where I frantically pump out words that generally turn out to be no good, but at least its something. When I’m at work, I have to get up an hour and a half before everyone else so I have time to make a coffee and have a quick sprint. There are a lot of to-do lists in the mix also, because I always manage to over commit myself with beta reads, writing goals, and Life.

So, what type of stories do you write?

Speculative YA with flawed MCs and dark themes. Though I am currently plotting a contemporary which is meant to be happy (it won’t be).

Sounds fun! Your most recent big writing news is that you’re repped by Carrie Howland. How did you land an agent?

It took a looooong time. I finished Illusion of a Majesty back in either 2010 or 2011. It was seriously no good. There were rough little gems throughout but that first draft has been 99% reworked and rewritten. It has gone through so many versions I have notebooks FILLED with info to try and keep track of it all. I entered some of the later versions into writing comps on twitter and they generally did okay but nothing came of it. I did a huge edit and decided to try my luck one more time before shelving (traditional querying wasn’t fun for me). Thankfully this comp was the one. Kate Angelella (editor magician) chose IoaM to work on out of over 2000 entries. We spent two months getting it perfect and in the agent round Carrie Howland asked to see the full. The day I got her email offering to work with me didn’t feel real. I expected the usual ‘this is great but not quite for me’ response, so when I actually read it, I couldn’t take it in. I made my husband read it to make sure I wasn’t hallucinating. I still go back to it sometimes to remind myself I’m not alone in having hope for my stories.

Naw, that’s beautiful. But I’ve read that story and can vouch for it’s awesomeness. Speaking of other rad authors, who’s your all time favourite?

My standard response used to be Richelle Mead (I love her!), until I read The Lunar Chronicles. I am such a Marissa Meyer fangirl it’s embarrassing. I will read anything she releases. When it comes to women’s fiction, I can’t go past Paige Toon.

Oh my gosh. I just finished reading The Lunar Chronicles and I adore all four of those books. Back to you now though, what’s one thing you can’t live without when you are writing?

My bestie (AKA Rebecca Bosevski). Poor thing has to suffer through my snapchats, my word count goals, and my constant whining that the story is no good and I need to delete everything. The amount of times she’s picked me up from an overemotional puddle on the floor is ridiculous and I wouldn’t have finished a story without her.

And one more question, who/what inspired you to be a writer?

I’ve always remembered writing. When I was in primary school I would have a different notebook for each story and create my own overs to go with them. They weren’t great, and even now I wouldn’t be able to make a cover worth a damn. I cowrote stories with friends in high school that never made it past a few chapters, and then a few years went by where I didn’t write anything. Funnily enough a character came to me sometime in my twenties who I couldn’t get out of my head. From there, my first book eventuated.

Fast Five!

Morning person or Night Owl – Morning. Though probably not by choice.
Tea or Coffee – Both. But I can’t function without coffee in the morning.
Harry Potter or Percy Jackson – Harry Potter for sure. Haven’t read PJ.
Writing or reading – Both equally. They compliment each other.
First person or third person (POV) – First.

Heather is rep’d by Carrie Howland of Donadio and Olsen

Heather lives in a little city in Australia with far too many voices in her head. She’s an escapist reader and writer and loves any story with ‘real’ characters who drive the plot. At the moment Heather is author assistant to the wonderful Sharon M. Johnston. Heather has teamed up with her awesome agent Carrie Howland and is currently shopping her most recent WIP (a YA fantasy), working full time, and eating far too much chocolate (haha, like that’s even a thing).

You can find her on Twitter or at Story Queens of Aus.

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This interview was conducted by Stacey Nash, who happens to think Heather is fabulous! Maybe it’s our joint love of YA. To find out more about Stacey’s books or to connect with her on social media (where she tries to be engaging), check out these places: www.stacey-nash.com, instagram, twitter, facebook.

 

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Our Love is in The Trope

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Credit: Bigstock images

Happy Valentines Day, AO&R readers!

Whether it’s something you celebrate or not, I think it’s hard to survive February without getting sucked into the cutesyness of it all. The huge red hearts, the dozens of roses, the white teddy bears. It’s everywhere you look. Even at my kids’ school, where the little ones where handing out lollipops to one another.

Anyhoo, all this loving got me thinking about romance in books at how there tends to be set tropes that are followed. Even in YA! Just thinking about the last half a dozen books I’ve read, every single one of them follows a similar romantic path. Even though it’s predictable as readers we often gravitate towards the same trope over and over.

So what are these romance tropes? Ah … here’s the ones I think are most common in young and new adult books:

The Love Triangle: The dreaded love triangle is actually one of my favourites. I think perhaps it was overdone a few years back, which is why so many readers now shy away. I’m still a sucker for a well written triangle though, where the heroine (or hero) has to decide between two suitors. Some of my favorites = The Infernal Devices by Cassandra Clare. Matched by Ally Condie

Friends turned lovers: When the characters have been friends for years and suddenly their friendship grows into more.  I think this one makes for a sweet story. My favourites = Frigid by J Lynn. Hopeless by Colleen Hoover.

Enemies to Lovers: When the characters hate each other’s guts, but we all know hate is only a step away from lurve. The sizzling tension that comes with this trope gives me all the feels! It’s got to me my absolute favourite. Best examples = The Lux Series by J L Armentrout, Under the Never Sky by Veronica Rossi.

Forbidden Love: This is a fun one too, and it also sizzles with sexual tension. Usually the couple are deeply in love/lust with each other but the can’t be together because Montagues and Capulets. My favourite examples = Delirium by Lauren Oliver. Fallen by Lauren Kate.

Opposites Attract: She’s a book nerd, he loves sports. She hates self absorbed people, he is one. (well she thinks he is) This trope can work well too, although I haven’t seen as much of it in YA as I have the others. Top picks = If I Stay by Gayle Forman. Lola and the Boy Next Door by Sephanie Perkins.

Are there any other typical romance plots you’ve noticed? If so share, share away in the comments. I’d love to hear all about them.

 

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Stacey NashStacey Nash has written one of all of these tropes. To find out more about the love stories she’s had published or to connect with her on social media (where she tries to be engaging), check out these places: www.stacey-nash.com, instagram, twitter, facebook.

Are you an Aussie YA writer?

If so then we want you!

It’s not often a contributor place opens up on an established blog, but that’s exactly what has happened here at AO&R. With several changes at the end of last year, we’ve found ourselves a blogger short and because we want to make sure there’s a steady supply of fresh material for our readers we’re looking to fill the hole.

It’s a monthly gig and you need to meet two criteria to jump on board.

  1. You need to be an Aussie, because well … we are Aussie Owned.
  2. You need to be a writer of either young adult or new adult fiction, because that’s what we’re all about.

If you think this sounds like you please get in contact with us at aussieownedandread [at] gmail {dot] com Except you know, without the brackets and spelled out “at” and “dot”. 😉

We can’t wait to hear from you!

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Image courtesy of cooldesign at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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Beyond beginnings …

It seems fitting that our topic for January is beginnings. 2017 brings with it many changes and hopes after a particularly unusual and tough year for many.

As for me, I’m hoping that with the new year I will carve for myself a fresh beginning with my writing. You see, I had a tough time with it during 2016. With three kids, four after school activities, three separate schools, two P&C committees, and only one me it was a rather time-poor year. And as a writer who thrives off the total immersion method I found myself unable to pen new words. Basically I just couldn’t get my head in the story. The same with reading. I found myself reading the same pages over and over again, unable to move forward because there was never enough time or head space for imagination.

Yet, beginnings are the one thing I didn’t struggle with. Whatever sucked up my creativity seems not to have affected my ability to pen first chapters. I have a grand total of five beginnings that are so darn intriguing (no modesty here) that I’m determined to make them full stories this year.

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Getting past Chapter One can be a chore.

 

So what is the trick of getting beyond the beginning?

  • Stick to it: don’t allow yourself to be sidetracked by shiny new ideas. Write them down then come back to story number 1.
  • Plot it: If you’re having trouble finishing a story, plan out where it’s going next. In fact, plan it all the way to the end.
  • Make time: If, like me, you’re strapped for time get up half an hour earlier, stay up half an hour later, write in your lunch break. Whatever it is you need to do to snag a few minutes of writing time, do it.
  • Don’t edit: you heard me. Don’t read yesterday’s words before writing new ones. That chews up valuable writing time and makes it impossible to move forward to new words.

Let’s hope that 2017 is a productive writing year!

I plan on sticking to these golden rules to finish my stories. Do you have any tips for getting beyond the beginning?

Happy writing!

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Stacey NashStacey Nash is going to write lots of great words this year. To find out more about the great words she’s already had published or to connect with her on social media (where she tries to be engaging), check out these places: www.stacey-nash.com, instagram, twitter, facebook.

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Clean Out The Crap – how to spring clean your final draft

This month we’re talking about spring cleaning on Aussie Owned & Read. Because I’m sure none of us can spring clean our bookshelves — because there’s no books to clean out, right? Who does that?! — we’re taking a writing approach to the topic by talking about ways you can apply spring cleaning to your manuscript.

For me first drafts are all about getting the story out there. Drafting like tomorrow doesn’t matter and not stopping until I reach those magic words ‘the end’. If I don’t write this way, I get stuck in a perpetual editing loop of perfecting yesterday’s words and never writing any new ones. This means I’m often always left with a hot mess at the end of the first draft.

So how does one clean up that disaster?

By making all the big changes first, of course. Adding, deleting, rearranging scenes. Once that’s all sorted (usually two drafts later) I like to clean up my manuscript by sweeping through and killing all the unnecessary words.

Nasty ‘telling’ words to omit from your manuscript.

See, hear, taste, feel, is/was: these are almost always telling words.

just, only, really: most of the time these are just filler.

that: it can almost always been removed from a sentence without  changing the meaning.

almost, seemed, started, began: Making things absolute makes for a stronger POV.

now: telling word.

stood up / sat down: when used in context it’s not possible to sit any other way than down, thus the word down is rendered unnecessary. The same rule applies to up.

Those are a few of the words I like to spring clean from my final draft. What about you? Are there any words you like to nix?

 

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Stacey NashStacey Nash is the messiest first drafter ever. Lucky she edits and edits and edits some more to make up for it. To find out more about this young adult author or to connect with her on social media (where she tries to be engaging), check out these places: www.stacey-nash.com, instagram, twitter, facebook.

Literary fathers – why they’re important

In honour of Fathers Day this month, we’ve set a fatherly theme for all of our August posts. We hope you enjoy the celebration of great men in our lives and books.

A few years ago it seemed that absent or bad mothers were a popular trend in YA fiction. It doesn’t seem so apparent in more recent YA, but one thing I have noticed in both older and newer works is the importance of a fatherly figure. Just like in real life teens need to have a solid role model. Someone who fits the role of mentor as well as protector, and sometimes tormentor. Not only teen boys need a fatherly figure, but girls do too. Dads teach their kids how to drive cars, their boys how to shave, and their girls how to be treated well. Mother’s can definitely do these things too, but often in fiction it’s the dad’s role.

This absence of mother trend in early YA led to many single dads struggling to understand their hormone-driven rebellious daughters and I think, out of that trend we saw some pretty awesome fathers doing the best they could. The first one who springs to mind is

  • Charlie Swan – (Twilight series) He may have been awkward as anything trying to deal with Bella, but Charlie Swan loved his girl and did everything he could to keep her safe and to keep their relationship strong.

Then there are all the YA books that have the absent mother trope reversed. In these stories we often find a fatherly figure stepping up to the plate. These amazing men are by far some of my very favourite characters and I’ve even written one of my own in the Collective Series. Some of my picks include;

  • Harry Potter – With both of his parents dead and horrid stand ins as his guardians, a whole cast of men step in to fill the fatherly role for Harry Potter.  From the brief encounters with Sirus Black to the constant mentoring from Albus Dumbledoor, and even Severus Snape’s protection, Harry certainly has no shortage of wonderful men in his life. Let’s not forget Hargrid the man who’s door is always open to the sometimes emotional and often stressed teen.
  • Luke Garraway – (Mortal Instruments Series) With her real father absent and let’s face it, kind of psychopathic, Luke is a great fill in for Clary Fray. He’s compassionate, caring, and treats her as his own.
  • My Life After Now – this book features not one, but two great Dads, who are both caring, compassionate and present throughout their daughter’s contraction of HIV.ID-100231764

Which fictional fathers are your favourite?


Stacey Nash Stacey Nash has written many fatherly figures; evil dads (Wait! & Remember Me), great dads (Pretend…) and step in fatherly figures (Collective Series, Stolen Sanctuary). To find out more about this young adult author or to connect with her on social media (where she tries to be engaging), check out these places: www.stacey-nash.com, instagram, twitter, facebook.

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