Point of View

Here on AOR this month we’re each looking at different elements that make up a great story. Point of view, or POV as it’s often referred to, is so important.

But first…. WHAT IS IT?

Simply, it’s the perspective from which the story is told.

This isn’t simply which character but rather the style/technique used. There are several common types of POV.

FIRST PERSON:

Here, the main character (usually) tells the story in the form of an ‘I’ narrator.

First person POV is used often in YA writing in particular because it has that sense of immediacy. however, it is important to note that the reader can’t know anything the character doesn’t see/hear/experience.

An example of a recent first person book I read and loved was ‘TRUST’ by Kylie Scott. It opens with a hold up in a convenience store and the POV makes the reader experience that drama along with Edie, the main character.

Trust-Cover

THIRD PERSON:

Single – here, the POV is limited to one character but uses ‘he’ or ‘she’ or ‘it’ form. Again the reader is limited by what that character knows. Can choose to be ‘deep’ where we’re right in that character’s head or further away.

Multiple – again ‘he’ or ‘she’ or ‘it’  but can follow multiple characters in the story. It works best to change view points at obvious scene/chapter breaks.

Omniscient – again ‘he’ or ‘she’ or ‘it’  but now the narrator knows everything. Kind of a narrator god.

In the Harry Potter series, which is written in the 3rd person, we see most of the action from Harry’s POV and often experience his emotions strongly however we sometimes see from other characters POV too (eg at the beginning of each book).

 

SECOND PERSON:

This is the ‘you’ for of narration and is the most unusual in fiction.

I actually can’t think of a book I’ve read in 2nd person POV. I’d love to know if you have?

 

I think that different POV work for different stories and the best way to work out what is best for you to read and write is to try them out.

 

🙂

Beck

beck nicholas_ bec sampson

I always wanted to write. I’ve worked as a lab assistant, a pizza delivery driver and a high school teacher but I always pursued my first dream of creating stories. Now, I live with my family near Adelaide, halfway between the city and the sea, and am lucky to spend my days (and nights) writing young adult fiction.

If I only knew…

By no means do I consider myself an expert at this but I have been writing for a while now and this month we’re sharing things we wish we’d known back when we were starting out.

  1.  The secret

Of course the secret is that there is no secret to any of it. There is craft and grind and learning and friends and showing up each day (or when you can). And I read this and was told this but I still thought there would be some magic secret that would make me a success.

Which brings me to:

2. Success

Enjoy the little wins. This is something I still struggle with. From the first opening the doc and starting (this is cool, lots of people are gonna write a book one day, to start even does man something I think) to writing the end there are so many wins.

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That’s before great feedback and crits, contest wins or even the day it’s published. I need to get better at focusing on each of them and worrying less about the things I want to improve. Don’t let worry steal joy.

3. The community

I didn’t realise I wouldn’t be alone. I’m super shy and awkward but people in the book community are so warm and welcoming and I’d like to still get better at this but they’re there to be embraced (metaphorically and sometimes even literally).

 

🙂

Beck

beck nicholas_ bec sampson

I always wanted to write. I’ve worked as a lab assistant, a pizza delivery driver and a high school teacher but I always pursued my first dream of creating stories. Now, I live with my family near Adelaide, halfway between the city and the sea, and am lucky to spend my days (and nights) writing young adult fiction.

Romancing the Reader

This month on Aussie Owned and Read we’re talking about romance. I’m a romantic at heart, I love the happy sigh when my couple get together. I love the tension and the payoff. I’d probably see a romance in a book even if there wasn’t one.

But, I think there’s a special romance in reading and that’s between the book/author and the reader.

I’ve felt it myself, for the Harry Potter series for example. I have pop figures and a wand and socks and more because that world holds a romance for me that I’ll never lose. I’ve read criticisms of the books, even agreed with some but it doesn’t change the romance for me.

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As a reader and writer it makes me wonder what it is that creates the romance.

First there is the courting. The reader needs to be wooed and for that there needs to be an initial attraction. The cover and title help with this. Who hasn’t fallen for a beautiful cover? Then there’s the author themselves. Thanks to the internet a reader can feel they know something about the author, through their social media and also other books they might have read. There’s word of mouth and advertising too.

That’s all well and good to get you on the book date but what keeps you there and gives the reader that love affair with a book?

I think it’s different for everyone but for me it’s a little like a relationship with another human. Keeping me entertained, following through on promises and mixing things up enough I don’t get bored.

Anyone had a great book romance recently?

(you’ll know cos you’ve gushed to your friends and stared lovingly at it more than necessary)

 

 

🙂

Beck

beck nicholas_ bec sampson

I always wanted to write. I’ve worked as a lab assistant, a pizza delivery driver and a high school teacher but I always pursued my first dream of creating stories. Now, I live with my family near Adelaide, halfway between the city and the sea, and am lucky to spend my days (and nights) writing young adult fiction.

Oops! I love the villain more!

This month we’re talking about villains. Something that I’ve always found interesting is that when you make a memorable striking villain, that has a decent enough goal to balance the hero and make them believable something strange can happen…

Readers fall for the villain!

Oops!

On this topic I straight away think of Harry Potter books and Draco in particular. Part of this is that he’s so well written and motivated and part of it is Tom Felton’s acting and portrayal that makes his Draco part of the character for me. There is a lot of fan-fiction written about this bad boy.

Draco_Mal

Tom Felton as Draco In Harry potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
PHOTO CREDIT: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draco_Malfoy

 

Then there’s the Darkling in the Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo. He is so bad he’s good and it’s not only Alina who struggles to resist him but the reader too (I mean is he that bad, really?). (mention to the Apparat here too).

Queen Levana from the Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer even has her own story (Fairest) in the series because she’s so complex and interesting.

They’re appealing and well driven I think the villain can become popular when the hero/heroine is genuinely caring for them. It’s hard, then, not to follow suit as a reader. It makes for excellent tension and a great read if, maybe, we’d like the villain to win just a little bit.

Who’s your loveable villain?

🙂

Beck

beck nicholas_ bec sampson

I always wanted to write. I’ve worked as a lab assistant, a pizza delivery driver and a high school teacher but I always pursued my first dream of creating stories. Now, I live with my family near Adelaide, halfway between the city and the sea, and am lucky to spend my days (and nights) writing young adult fiction.

Five Book Marketing Tips You Can Try Today

We’re talking marketing for April and I immediately panicked and flailed. Then, I decided to consult an expert. When I think of YA authors who’ve done marketing well from the ground floor, I think of THE YA GIRL, Jennifer Bardsley.

I asked her for her 5 best Marketing tips… And as luck would have it, she was happy to share!

Five Book Marketing Tips You Can Try Today By Jennifer Bardsley
It would be fun to have a bank account stashed with cash, a nanny at the ready, and a private jet to shuttle me off to book conferences all over the world, but the reality is that when it comes to marketing my books, I need to concentrate on free things I can do on my phone while my kids are taking swimming lessons. Here are five strategies I’ve learned to help connect my books with readers:

Start a Facebook Page
Here’s how.
Post a couple of times a day.
Be brief and witty.
Provide entertainment and encouragement.
Don’t constantly sell yourself or your book.
Only do a “buy my book post” once every twentieth post.
Respond to every comment.
See my article in SCWBI: Tips for Building up your Facebook Author Page.
Read my article for Adventures in YA Publishing Facebook Rules are a Must Read for Authors.
Join the Bookstagram Community on Instagram
Heart as many posts as possible.
Leave as many comments as possible.
When a new account follows you, give that person lots of hearts.
Tag your location in every picture.
Watch for new hashtag trends.
Don’t share another account’s photo without permission!!!!!!!!
Read my article for Adventures in YA Publishing: Great tips for writers using Instagram.

 

Join the #YAlit Community on Twitter
Post a few times a day.
Retweet to make friends.
Only use two or three hashtags.
Organize your followers in lists.
Uses lists to engage with targeted audiences.
Use Manage Flitter to unfollow people who don’t follow you back.

Build a Newsletter Mailing List
Have a sign up form on your website.
Include a sign up at the back of your book.
Run a Rafflecopter to encourage subscribers.
Stay with MailChimp until you hit 2,000 followers.
Switch to Mailer Lite when your list grows beyond 2,000, because it’s cheaper.
Shoot for a 50% open rate.

JB

 

About the Author
Jennifer Bardsley writes the column “I Brake for Moms” for The Everett Daily Herald. Her novel “Genesis Girl” debuted in 2016 from Month9Books, and the sequel “Damaged Goods” came out in 2017. “Genesis Girl” is about a teenager who has never been on the Internet. Jennifer however, is on the web all the time as “The YA Gal” with over 21,000 followers on Facebook, 19,000 followers on Instagram, and 11,000 followers on Twitter. Jennifer is a member of SCBWI, The Sweet Sixteens debut author group, and is founder of Sixteen To Read. An alumna of Stanford University, Jennifer lives near Seattle in the United States of America.

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Website Twitter Instagram Facebook Goodreads

 

I love these tips and can’t wait to try them out! Thanks so much for visiting today!!

🙂

Beck

beck nicholas_ bec sampson

I always wanted to write. I’ve worked as a lab assistant, a pizza delivery driver and a high school teacher but I always pursued my first dream of creating stories. Now, I live with my family near Adelaide, halfway between the city and the sea, and am lucky to spend my days (and nights) writing young adult fiction.

Interviewing Stacey Nash

This month here on the blog we’re celebrating having two fabulous new members with a series of interviews and today I’m super lucky to be chatting to Stacey Nash.

Stacey Nash

You’ve written both sci-fi (can I say I adored the Collective books!!) and contemporary – which is your favourite to write and why?

Aww, thanks! The Collective series in many ways was the story of my heart. But, I do love writing both genres and I can’t say that I prefer one over the other. I tend to switch back and forth between the two, depending on whichever takes my fancy.

 

Similarly, do you prefer YA like your sci-fi or NA like the Oxley College series?

There actually isn’t a lot of difference between my NA and my YA. That’s because I write to a sweet heat level (no shown sex scenes) and my young adult characters are in the upper age bracket and my new adult characters are in the lower age bracket. This makes the categories blur and become quite similar.

It’s great to find those sweet stories with characters a bit older and thinking about post-school type issues. 
You’re from the gorgeous Hunter Valley region – how important is where you come from to your writing?

I do love my local area, but I have actually never set a story here. Most of my stories are set or based loosely around other places I’ve lived. I would be lost without the beauty of my surrounds though. It inspires me daily.

I’d love to travel there one day. My only trip was a whirlwind science conference which didn’t give me much time to appreciate scenery.

I got to know you through RWA (Romance Writers of Australia) – how important is the balance of romance in your stories?

RWA has connected me with so many wonderful people. Thanks RWA! Umm, as far as balance goes it’s very important to get right. Too little it doesn’t have the power to pull the reader through the story. Too much and it becomes a yawn-fest of ‘are these characters going to doing anything else but make eyes at other?’ That’s purely my opinion though. As both a reader and as a writer I prefer the romance to be a strong subplot. I always need something a little more adventurous to keep me entertained, but I do need a little love thrown in to make me swoon.

I love a meaty plot too!
What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve received?

The first draft is for telling yourself the story. Subsequent drafts are for perfecting it.

Favourite childhood story?

I’m going to complicate this because it depends on what age we’re talking about. During my early years it would have been the BFG, but by the time I was 10 it had changed to Anne of Green Gables (the entire series) and stayed at that until I was around 14 when I discovered Tomorrow When the War Began (again, the entire series).

We seem to have similar tastes. I think TWTWB was a huge influence for me too.
What are you working on at the moment?

I’m working on a few things at the moment. I’m rewriting a YA sci-fi that once again blurs the magic/tech boundaries and I’ve just finished editing another NA contemp with a rural setting.

I can’t wait to read them!
Fast five questions:

Pantser or plotter? Both

Vanilla or chocolate? Vanilla

Novella or full-length? Full length

Series or standalone? Series

Day writing or Night? Day

 

BIO:

Writing for the young and new adult market, Stacey’s books are all adventure filled stories with a lot of adventure, a good dose of danger, a smattering of romance, and plenty of KISSING! Hailing from the Hunter Valley in New South Wales, she loves nothing more than immersing herself in the beauty and culture of the local area.

Her debut novel, FORGET ME NOT was released as a three book series (Collective Series) through HarperCollins Australia during 2014 / 2015. And her Oxley College Saga is out now.

Twitter / Facebook / Website

🙂

Beck

beck nicholas_ bec sampson

I always wanted to write. I’ve worked as a lab assistant, a pizza delivery driver and a high school teacher but I always pursued my first dream of creating stories. Now, I live with my family near Adelaide, halfway between the city and the sea, and am lucky to spend my days (and nights) writing young adult fiction.

 

 

What do you love?

This month, we’re talking about love. Today I’m caught up in the idea of bringing what I love into my writing… and what I hate I guess.

The things I love certainly influence my reading. I love an element of romance, I love Aussie settings, I love exotic settings, I love friendship and I love to have a good cry. These things all work together to influence which books I buy. The people I love do too, if a friend or admired blogger/author LOVES a book then I will try it even if it doesn’t have any of the elements I love personally.

My characters often share elements of what I love (or hate to mix things up). If I feel strongly about something then I know I can write a character who does too.

gringotts

I loooovvvveee all things Harry Potter

Right now I am madly in love with my new puppy Harriet Hermione Potts (so named from my love of Harry Potter). And I’m finding my new main character has a puppy. I ran the New York Marathon and found my character running to clear her head. Sometimes my characters love things that I specifically don’t however because they’re all different. For example, it’s fun, while I write, to be an amazing singer who wouldn’t make the audience wince in pain when they got up on a stage.

Do you look for elements you love when choosing a book to read/write?

 

🙂

Beck

beck nicholas_ bec sampson

I always wanted to write. I’ve worked as a lab assistant, a pizza delivery driver and a high school teacher but I always pursued my first dream of creating stories. Now, I live with my family near Adelaide, halfway between the city and the sea, and am lucky to spend my days (and nights) writing young adult fiction.