Losing my (diverse) virginity


In honour of NAIDOC (National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee) Week coming up this month, we’ve dedicated all our posts to the issue of diversity in fiction. For more information on NAIDOC Week, visit their website here.

I remember losing my (diverse) virginity, the first book I ever read that opened my eyes to diversity in reading. I was a teenager, possibly thirteen or fourteen, whenI got my  hands on My Place by Sally Morgan. This was biography sees our Aboriginal heroine, Sally, finally finding her place in the world. It’s a mystery about finding your identity, and working out where you truly belong in the world.

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Next, I went on to read Looking For Alibrandi, by Melina Marchetti. Again, this book dealt with someone who had a different heritage to my own. Josie is an Aussie teenager with Italian heritage, and finds it hard to fit in within her school society. This book became one of my absolute favourites as a young teenager, and took pride of place upon my shelf with My Place.

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Now, when people ask me about some of my favourite diverse books, these two instantly come to mind–but it’s a little surprising. What I remember loving most about these books doesn’t have a whole lot to do with colour or race or religion. What I LOVED about these books were the amazing heroines. Sally, a real woman who was so strong in her life’s journey. Josie, a fictional character who fought for what she believed in. Yes, both stories came with the added bonus of diversity, allowing me as a reader to have a glimpse into a life unfamiliar to my own, but at the core they were good, solid books with good, solid characters.

I think it’s absolutely important to  have diversity in what we read and what we write. Diversity is such a part of life–we see it every day, and I love that despite being a teenager and having my options for diverse books seeming limited, now, as an adult, diverse books are easier to find. However, what I love most about that is that reading a really good diverse book doesn’t feel like you’re reading a “diverse book”–just immersing yourself in another amazing story.

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Lauren K. McKellar is an author and editor of both fact and fiction. You can learn more about her at her website or over on her Facebook page.

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